3 essays 050

Reading Response #1 Prompt:In your 500 word essay, please discuss how the appropriation of images, strategies, materials, and media resulted in works that critiqued power and capital in both the Appropriation Art movement in the 1970-1990s and in practices in the 2000s that use “traditional crafts” like sewing and ceramics. materials u need to use in first PDF#2 Prompt:In your 500 word essay, Apply Petra Kupper’s discussion of any or all of the following: disability, performativity, agency, difference, and the construction of self, to the works of Carmen Papalia, Candoco, or any other artist/artworks that engage these issues. materials in the second PDF#3 Prompt:In your 500 word essay, please discuss some of the different strategies and political frameworks used by artists in these readings to effect direct social change. How might you use your own practice to address the current situation at SFAI and/or around issues of inequity underscored by the Covid-19 pandemic? Materials in the links belowhttps://www.kqed.org/arts/11321950/no-justice-with…https://hyperallergic.com/309432/extending-a-local
htca106_appropriation__materiality__and_craft_2.0_slides.pdf

petra_kuppers_____performance_and_disability__an_introduction_____in_disabilities_and_performance__bodies_on_edge__2013___1___11.pdf

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2.1 Jack Goldstein, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1975. 16 mm ?lm, color, sound, 2′.
Courtesy Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne and the Estate of Jack Goldstein.
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Postmodernism
That postmodernism is indefinable is a truism. However, it can be described as a
set of critical, strategic and rhetorical practices employing concepts such as
difference, repetition, the trace, the simulacrum, and hyperreality to destabilize
other concepts such as presence, identity, historical progress, epistemic certainty,
and the univocity of meaning.
The term “postmodernism” first entered the philosophical lexicon in 1979, with
the publication of The Postmodern Condition by Jean-François Lyotard.
2.2 Sherrie Levine,
Un/tled (President 4),
1979. Collage on paper,
24 x 18″ (60.9 x 45.7
cm). The Metropolitan
Museum of Art, New
York. © Sherrie Levine.
Courtesy Paula Cooper
Gallery, New York.
2.3 Sherrie Levine,
A8er Walker Evans:
7, 1981. GelaXn silver
print, 5 1/16 x 3
7/8″ (12.8 x 9.8 cm).
The Metropolitan
Museum of Art, New
York. © Sherrie
Levine. Courtesy Paula
Cooper Gallery, New
York.
2.4 Walker Evans,
Farmhouse Hale
County, Alabama,
1936. GelaXn silver
print. 71 1/16 x 6
5/16″ (19.5 x 16.1 cm).
The Library of Congress.
.
Walker Evans,
Burroughs Family, Hale County Alabama,
1936.
Walker Evans,
Country Store and Gas Station, Alabama,
1936.
Dorothea Lange,
Plantation Owner and His Field Hands Near
Clarksdale, Mississippi,
1936.
Dorothea Lange,
Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California,
1936.
Sherrie Levine,
After Edward Weston,
1980.
Edward Weston,
Dunes, Oceano,
1936.
Edward Weston,
Pepper No. 30,
1930.
Edward Weston,
Dunes, Oceano,
1936.
Edward Weston,
Nude,
1925.
Straight Photography
ALFRED STIEGLITZ,
The Steerage,
1907 (print 1915). Photogravure (on
tissue),
1’ 3/8” x 10 1/8”.
Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth.
2.3 Sherrie Levine, A8er Walker Evans: 7, 1981.
GelaXn silver print, 5 1/16 x 3 7/8”.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. ©
Sherrie Levine.
Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York.
2.4 Walker Evans, Farmhouse Hale County,
Alabama, 1936.
GelaXn silver print.
71 1/16 x 6 5/16″ (19.5 x 16.1 cm).
The Library of Congress.
2.5 Richard Prince, Un/tled (Cowboy), 1995. Ektacolor photograph, 48 x 72“ (121.9 x 182.9 cm).
Courtesy Richard Prince Studio.
Richard Prince, untitled (Cowboy), 1989.
Ektacolor photograph, unique, 50” x 70”.
Ronald Reagan, U.S. President 1981–89.
Ronald Reagan is an actor. He is directed and produced…. He and his directors know that
television elects presidents.
—Barbara Kruger
2.6 Richard Prince, Criminals and Celebri/es, 1986. Photographic paper with 9 Ektacolor
photographs, 86 x 48″ (218.4 x 121.9 cm). Courtesy Richard Prince Studio.
Richard Prince,
untitled (four single men with
interchangeable backgrounds
looking to the right),
1977.
Mixed media on paper,
23” x 19”.
Dada
Hannah Höch,
Cut with the Kitchen Knife
Dada through the Last Weimar
Beer Belly Cultural Epoch of
Germany,
1919–1920.
Photomontage,
3’ 9” x 2’ 11 1/2”.
Richard Hamilton,
Just What is it That Makes Today’s
Homes So Different,
So Appealing?,
1956.
Collage on paper.
Independent Group,
Parallel of Life and Art,
exhibition installation,
Institute of Contemporary Art,
London,
1953.
Dan Graham,
Homes for America,
1966.
Conceptual photo text piece
published in Arts magazine.
Robert Barry,
Inert Gas Series,
1969.
Joseph Kosuth,
One and Three Chairs,
1965.
Bernd and Hilla Becher,
Water Towers,
1972.
Nine black and white photograph,
individually framed.
52 ?” x 40 ?” x 1 ½” overall.
Douglas Huebler,
Variable Piece #4,
1968.
Martha Rosler,
from the series Bringing the War Home:
House Beautiful,
1967–72.
Photomontage.
Richard Prince,
untitled (four single men with
interchangeable backgrounds
looking to the right),
1977.
Mixed media on paper,
23” x 19”.
Richard Prince,
untitled (four single men with
interchangeable backgrounds
looking to the right),
1977.
Mixed media on paper,
23” x 19”.
Installation view of Richard Prince’s exhibition Portraits
at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit in 2019.
2.7 Cindy Sherman,
Un/tled Film S/ll #35,
1979. Black-and-white
photograph, 10 x
8″ (25.4 x 20.32 cm).
EdiXon of 10. Courtesy
of the arXst and Metro
Pictures, New York.
#6
#2
#13
#7
#35
#10
#54
#21
Cindy Sherman, Untitled Film Stills, 1977–80.
#7
#15
#56
Judith Butler: “Gender is in no way a stable identity or locus of agency…rather, it
is an identity tenuously constituted in time—an identity instituted through a stylized
repetition of acts.”
2.8 Cindy Sherman,
Un/tled #152, 1985. Color
photograph, 72 1/2 x 49
3/8″ (184.2 x 125.4 cm).
EdiXon of 6. Courtesy of
the arXst and Metro
Pictures, New York.
2.9 Sigourney Weaver in Alien, 1979. Film sXll. 20th Century Fox.
2.10 Silvia Kolbowski, Model Pleasure I, 1982. 3 chromogenic and 7 gelaXn silver prints, each 10 x 8” (25.4 x 20.3 cm).
CollecXon: Walker Art Center. Image courtesy the arXst.
2.11 Silvia Kolbowski,
Monumental Prop/
por/ons, 1983.
Pamphlet #2 included
loose with Wedge,
issues 3/4/5, edited by
Phil Mariani and Brian
Wallis, 1983 (New York).
Exact dimensions of this
print unknown.
Magazine 12 pp, 8.5 x
8.5″ (21.59 x 21.59 cm).
CollecXon MACBA,
Centre d’Estudis i
Documentació. Image
courtesy the arXst.
2.12 Allan McCollum, Collec/on of Forty Plaster Surrogates, 1982–84. Enamel on cast Hydrostone. 40 panels ranging from
5 x 4 1/8″ (12.8 x 10.2 cm) to 20 1/4 x 16 1/4″ (51.3 x 41.1 cm), overall 64” x 9′ 2″ (162.5 x 279.4 cm). The Museum of
Modern Art, New York. Courtesy of the arXst and Barbara Krakow Gallery, Boston.
2.13 Allan McCollum, In
the Collec/on of …,
1985. Cover of photo/
text essay. Courtesy of
the arXst and Barbara
Krakow Gallery, Boston.
2.14 Louise Lawler, Pollock and Tureen, 1984. Cibachrome, 16 x 20” (40.6 x 50.8 cm). EdiXon of 5.
Courtesy of the arXst and Metro Pictures, New York.
Louise Lawler,
Untitled 1950-51,
1987.
Louise Lawler,
Pollock and Tureen, Arranged by Mr. and Mrs.
Burton Tremaine, Connecticut,
1984.
2.15 Louise Lawler and Allan McCollum, Ideal SeUngs: For Presenta/on and Display, 1983–84. ca.100 objects of wax
and shoe polish on cast, pigmented Hydrostone, each 9 x 9 x 2 1/4″ (22.86 x 22.86 x 5.7 cm). InstallaXon designed by
McCollum and Lawler, with theatrical lighXng and sales price projected on wall, at the Diane Brown Gallery, New York,
1984. Courtesy of the arXsts and Barbara Krakow Gallery, Boston.
2.16 Barbara Kruger, Un/tled (We don’t need another hero), 1986. Photographic silkscreen/vinyl.
109 x 210″ (277 x 533 cm). © Barbara Kruger. Courtesy Mary Boone Gallery, New York.
I
2.17 Barbara Kruger,
Mary Boone Gallery
installa/on, New York,
1991. © Barbara Kruger.
Courtesy Mary Boone
Gallery, New York.
Barbara Kruger, untitled, poster, 1983
Barbara Kruger, untitled billboard, 1982
Barbara Kruger, cover for Ms.
Magazine, 1982
Barbara Kruger, untitled, 1981
Barbara Kruger, untitled, 1990, billboard, Columbus, OH (commissioned by the
Wexner Center for the Arts)
Woman carrying Kruger shopping bag
Barbara Kruger, untitled (I Shop Therefore I Am),
photographic silkscreen on vinyl, 1987
Identity Politics
Barbara Kruger,
Untitled (Your Gaze Hits the Side of My
Face),
1981.
Photograph, red painted frame,
4’ 7” x 3’ 5”.
2.19 Jenny Holzer, from Truisms (1977–79), 1977. O?set poster, 24 x 18″ (61 x 45.7 cm).
InstallaXon in New York, 1977. Courtesy Jenny Holzer Studio.
Jenny Holzer, Truisms, 1977-9
Jenny Holzer, Truisms, on the LED board in
New York’s Times Square, 1982
Jenny Holzer, Truisms, stickers on the
streets of New York, 1980
Jenny Holzer, Truisms (airplane banners),
Oct. 2004, presented by Creative Time, NYC
Jenny Holzer, Truism, t-shirt, 1983
Identity Politics
GUERRILLA GIRLS, The Advantages of Being A Woman Artist, 1988. Offset print, 17“ x22”. Collection of the
artists.
2.18 Guerrilla Girls, Do women have to be naked to get into
the Met. Museum?, 1989. Poster, 11 x 28″ (27.9 x 71.1 cm).
Private collecXon. Courtesy Guerrilla Girls.
Identity Politics
FAITH RINGGOLD, Who’s
Afraid of Aunt Jemima?, 1983.
Acrylic on canvas with fabric
borders, quilted, 7’ 6” x 6’
8”. Private collection.
Identity Politics
Ghada Amer, Grey Lines, 2004.
Identity Politics
Ghada Amer, And the Beast, 2004.
Acrylic, embroidery, and gel medium on canvas.

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